San Pedro de Atacama to Salar de Uyuni – Day 1

The day before we were headed to the salt flats tour we stocked up on snacks and water as we were told by the tour operator. We brought 9 liters of water and a lot of crackers and chocolate. There was reports on the food not being plenty and of sub-par quality, hopefully crackers and chocolate would help us then. We also bought coca leafs to chew and make tea of to help with altitude sickness. Finally we bought a thick jumper each, and I bought a winter cap. It is cold at high altitude!

The first day began with waking up at 06:30, grabbing our already packed bags and breakfast that our hostel kindly had prepared for us. The bus took us first to the Chilean border control, conveniently located in San Pedro. There we got our exit stamp as we both had been good enough not to loose the receipt that we got when entering Chile.

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After this the bus drove us to the Bolivian border control, at an altitude of about 4000 meters even walking made us need to stop to catch our breath. The border control is quick and without anything fancy, EU passport holders just get the stamp, others might have to pay and get the stamp. At no point did anyone mention anything about a “fee” to get the stamp other than the official one for US citizens among others.

After getting the stamp we were served a very nice breakfast, leaving the one we brought from the hostel redundant. We were asked to arrange ourselves in groups of six in each group, we found a great group!

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In the picture above, taken by Fran who was the 6th member of the group is, from left to right:

Diego, German, Linn, Felipe and me, Jon. We all had a great time together during our trip through the desert, along with our driver Richard. And thanks to Fran who brought a real camera we will have very good pictures from the whole tour!

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Here we have our first stop to actually see something on the tour, Laguna Verde, the green lagoon. The green color comes from minerals that are stirred up by the wind. We were actually lucky to see it as the wind started blowing just as we made our stop.

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Back in the Land Cruiser for a while before we arrived at Desierto de Dalí which is a part of the desert that got its name because looks very similar to the paintings of Salvador Dalí. If you imagine some melting clocks in the frame above you might understand where they got the name from. (picture by Fran).

After another while in the car we visited some hot springs which we got an opportunity to take a dip in. at 38 degrees Celsius it was more than welcome. It really gets cold at altitude, we were wearing double jumpers, a wind jacket a winter hats but still felt cold at times. The only bad thing about the hot springs was that you needed to get up after a while as we had to continue to our next destination.

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At a lovely altitude of almost 5000 meters my headache was getting worse even though I tried to chew as much coca leafs as possible. Linn was also enjoying a worsening headache combined with some dizziness.

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But you have to sacrifice something to see the planet do things like this. A big field of geysers with some gray boiling substance was presented to us. Some of the geysers even gave away big whiffs of smoke, with a smell of sulfur, somewhat hard to decide if it smelled like matches or a fart.

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After yet some more time in our lovely car we arrived at our stop for the night (photo by Fran) at an altitude of 4700 m. Here we were served a late lunch consisting of mashed potato, sausage and a salad. After all we had done during the day, nothing ever tasted so good!

Linns altitude sickness was getting worse, and the plan was to leave the hostel for a while to see a nearby lagoon that is home to a lot of flamingos. When walking to the car Linn almost fainted and decided to stay and try to get some sleep. I and the rest of the group drove to the lagoon while I was teaching them some Swedish words and they taught me Chilean slang. Cachai? Snö. Filete.

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The lagoon was colored red by algae and is housing a population of at least a few hundred flamingos. A lot nicer than to see the few flamingos in a zoo living more or less in their own excrement (at least that is how it usually smells). The flamingos were not even that afraid of us, we could get rather close to watch them dredging the lagoon for food.

After our flamingo spotting we went back to the hostel to have some coffee and some well earned rest. Most of the day was spent sitting in a car, but that takes its toll when it is at high altitude. Linns altitude sickness had worsened further, symptoms including nosebleed and getting rid of the lunch. We made her some coca tea and our driver Richard gave her a pill. In the end I think that the pill did the main part of the work and the coca tea was there as a helper, but she felt a lot better and slept like a baby.

We all slept great, the beds were not too comfortable but we got many thick blankets and stayed warm even though I and Linn did not have any sleeping bags with us. The exhaustion from a day filled with too many things did also help to make sure we slept good.

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